Wulfendragon Character Cards

Wulfendragon Character Cards

Well, I’ve changed the name of Book 4 to Wulfendragon. I’ll explain more about how that name came about later, but for now I thought I would give a quick update and share some images of the characters so you could see a bit how I write. I used to use little figurines to help me keep track of all my characters, but that got progressively more complicated and expensive as the stories grew. So now I search for images on pinterest, size them in photoshop, print, and cut them out. Then I put them in collector card sleeves. The images I find aren’t exactly what I picture in my mind, but they work beautifully – and it is a lot of fun to arrange them when I’m starting a new scene, and I can keep other cards grouped according to where they are ‘off screen’ so as to help me keep track of what is going on in the story as a whole.                        You’ll recognize some of the old characters here and as you can see I’ve introduced some new ones. I’m especially having fun with Buttersmere, the assistant to Clive Greyhame Gettlefinger.      But, just as his eyes settled on the document, he was startled by a deep voice, “You, Buttersmere. I had hoped to enjoy some solitude before our meeting.” Buttersmere’s smile disappeared at once. He looked up into the sober frown of Father Scabtree. His hair was streaked with grey, and pulled back from his forehead, and then it feathered strangely out to the sides and down his neck. Deep creases were everywhere...
The Green Archer Intro

The Green Archer Intro

I’ve got the fourth book of the Peleg Chronicles outlined – about 40 pages of notes, and I’m excited. And Nervous. It’s been a long time since I’ve written, and the doubts have begun. Especially after two of my readers were a little uncomfortable with chapter one. So, in my weakness, I’ve run to the scriptures to make sure I’m aligning myself properly with His Word, with the mind of Christ. I’m reassessing, but still hopeful. In the meantime, I thought I would post the introduction to book 4, which I’m pretty sure will be called ‘The Green Archer”. Here’s the rough draft:   Mamma, the giant badger, ambled through the den. She checked the main exit, sniffed the air, and turned back into the main run. She paused at her skunks; all three were tucked away into a small chamber. They did not stir for they were in their time of the deep-sleep. She turned at the next intersecting run, and found the rest of her clan, six badgers in all; they too were sleeping. It was the middle of the day, they had eaten much in their last night’s hunt, and so they were tired. But not Mamma. A restlessness was upon her. Ever since the battle with the bright-shinies, she found herself wondering about her very own man-thing. What had become of him? She entered his chamber next, moved among his belongings, and smelled them. In the corner was a wooden chest. She had seen him peering into it at times. Using her paws, she managed to open it quickly enough. Inside were clothes the color...
Choose Your Own Adventure Part 2

Choose Your Own Adventure Part 2

After my twelve-year-old read a few Choose Your Own Adventure’s, she really enjoyed them, but she had two complaints. The first: “In some of the stories, no matter what decision you make, you end up at the same place.” This is known as “False Forking”. For a good technical article on interactive fiction click here. The second problem: “There was never any danger of not being able to finish the story or any danger of possibly losing one’s life.” As soon as she realized this, the sense of urgency and excitement would drain away. Danger, tension, dilemmas … in a word, conflict. Conflict is at the heart of good storytelling. So one way to add more real choices in interactive fiction without making the story impossibly long is to have more of those choices lead to a definite end, a failing end. Something like: The Green Archer, half-starved, decides to eat the moldy bread. Dizziness ensues. Reaching for a chair, he stumbles. He falls to the floor. Arms, legs, even his neck feel like they are weighed down with stones. His eyes also are heavy … so very tired, he lets them close. The story path the reader was on just ended, and it ended badly. Now the reader knows that there is something at stake for making a bad decision — tension and excitement necessarily heighten. Now for a whole new twist. Game fiction! What’s that you say? It’s Choose Your Own Adventure with the added element of solo game play. The reader might need a piece of paper, pencil and a six-sided die. She can keep track...
Lap Book / Unit Study

Lap Book / Unit Study

We often get asked about material for further study to go along with the Peleg Chronicles. So, with that in mind we’ve begun putting together a Lap Book study type guide. It might be a while before the finished product is available so we’ve decided to periodically give a few pages away as a download for you to print up and use with your children. Click on the images below to get a larger version.                                                 Here is a list of some of the topics we’re looking at developing. Until then, maybe they will give you some ideas to pursue on your own: – Logic – Worldview – Battle tactics – Castles – The Word – Truth – Dragons – Giants – Fear – Trust – Gospel in Old Testament – Swords – Weapons/Armor – False Gods / Images – Heroes – Bad Guys – Music – Teaching – Boldness – Family / Orphans – Exhorting / Encouraging – Grace / Redemption. Can someone as bad as the Dragon Priest or Count Rosencross come to be saved. – Cavemen/Tump Barrows. What did the Israelites want to do when they felt like they were grasshoppers in the sight of giant men. – Slavery … physical and spiritual. Menstealing. – Generations / Descendents I hope these are a blessing to you. In Jesus, Matt...